Wednesday, September 21, 2011

Bright Not Broken

image credit to www.amazon.com


Yezza.. Kak Mon dah mula galak ber-blog semula :D

This is my current read. This may appeal to just some of us. Having gone through a bit of experience raising a mild-ADHD, this is an inspiring book.

I urge all of us to take action when your detect a delayed milestone (which is not in normal range. as I said in my older entries, don't be pressured if your 3yo can't read yet when your neighbour's can) Early intervention is very very very important. Ini permulaan penting yang akan membentuk masa depan anak-anak. Even for normal children. What more children with special needs.

I bought my copy from Kinokuniya KLCC for RM76.00.

Written by Diane M. Kennedy, Rebecca S. Bass and contibutions by Temple Grandin

Here's an excerpt from the book. Credit to http://www.josseybass.com/

The future of our society depends on our gifted children—the population in which we’ll find our next Isaac Newton, Albert Einstein, or Virginia Woolf. Yet the gifts and talents of some of our most brilliant kids may never be recognized because these children fall into a group known as twice exceptional, or “2e.” Twice exceptional kids are both gifted and diagnosed with a disability—often ADHD or an Autism Spectrum Disorder—leading teachers and parents to overlook the child’s talents and focus solely on his weaknesses. Too often, these children get lost in an endless cycle of chasing diagnostic labels and are never given the tools to fully realize their own potential.

Bright Not Broken sheds new light on this vibrant population by identifying who twice exceptional children are and taking an unflinching look at why they’re stuck. The first work to boldly examine the widespread misdiagnosis and controversies that arise from our current diagnostic system, it serves as a wake-up call for parents and professionals to question why our mental health and education systems are failing our brightest children.

Most importantly, the authors show what we can do to help 2e children, providing a whole child model for parents and educators to strengthen and develop a child’s innate gifts while also intervening to support the deficits. Drawing on painstaking research and personal experience, Bright Not Broken offers groundbreaking insight and practical strategies to those seeking to help 2e kids achieve their full potential




3 comments:

abi said...

just watched the movie, Temple Grandin. she is an autistic professor expert in livestock.

aida said...

kak mon.. kencang berblog sekarang :)

ummi said...

abi ~ inspiring kan.

aida ~ sejak2 makan ayam goreng kat Pak Abu ni macam dpt inspirasi pulak ha ha ha